bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities

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Reference and Bibliographic [sic] Dept., University of Florida Libraries in cooperation with the Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida , Gainesville
Caribbean Area -- Emigration and immigration -- Bibliogr

Places

Caribbean

Statementcompiled and edited by Rosemary Brana-Shute with the assistance of Rosemarijn Hoefte.
SeriesBibliographic series ;, no. 9, Bibliographic series (Gainesville, Fla.) ;, no. 9.
ContributionsHoefte, Rosemarijn, 1959-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsZ7164.I3 B7 1983, JV7322 B7 1983
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiv, 339 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3177328M
LC Control Number83019795

A Bibliography of Caribbean Migration and Caribbean Immigrant Communities. Gainesville: Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, Gainesville: Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, Bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities.

Gainesville: Reference and Bibliographic [sic] Dept., University of Florida Libraries in cooperation with the Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication. bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities.

Challenging the received wisdom that a dramatic growth in migration is undesirable, the book proposes new Author: Christine Swann. In his book, The Migration of Peoples from bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities.

Gainesville: University of Press of Florida. Conway, D. (, January). Migration in Caribbean immigrant communities. Gainesville: University of Press of Florida.

In Search of a Better Life: Perspectives on Migration from the Caribbean (New York: Praeger Publishers, Palmer, Ransford. Pilgrims from the Sun: West Indian Migration to America. This anthology represents important and original directions in the study of Caribbean migration.

Details bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities FB2

It takes a comparative perspective on the Caribbean people's migratory experiences to North America, Europe, and within the Caribbean. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the book discusses: * the causes of migration * the experiences of migrants. Caribbean immigrants represent 10 percent of the million immigrants in the United States, with the vast bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities book coming from just five countries: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Haiti, and Trinidad and Tobago.

Depending on their origin country and period of arrival, immigrants from the Caribbean have varying skill levels, racial composition, language background, and motivations for.

This anthology represents important and original directions in the study of Caribbean migration. It takes a comparative perspective on the Caribbean people's migratory experiences to North America, Europe, and within the Caribbean.

Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the book discusses: * the causes of migration * the experiences of migrants * the historical, cultural and political processes.

This volume examines the phenomenon of mass population migration from the Caribbean to North America and the United Kingdom and the social, cultural, and economic adaptation of the immigrants to their new environments.

A central theme of this volume is that twentieth century Caribbean migration is more than the migration of labor in search of jobs; it is also a movement of households and thus. Immigration from the Caribbean to the United States is a relatively recent phenomenon, beginning largely after This report provides a demographic profile of the million Caribbean immigrants in the United States: their geographic settlement, education and workforce characteristics, earnings, modes of entry, and more.

As Latin American and Caribbean countries face a dual challenge—managing large-scale Venezuelan arrivals alongside the COVID pandemic—reliable data on the characteristics of newcomers are essential to policymaking. This MPI-IOM fact sheet offers a profile of refugees and migrants in 11 countries in the region, including their demographics, labor market participation.

"Creatively drawing on documentary sources and oral histories, Tinker offers invaluable insights into the social, political, and economic forces that have helped shape the history of West Indian migrations to the Bahamas--a country that has often been overlooked in Caribbean migration studies."--Frederick H.

Smith, author of Caribbean Rum Although the Bahamas is geographically part of the West. This is a part of the series of four lectures on Dreams and a Special Destination: Fifty Years of Caribbean Migration to Britain, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the arrival of The SS Empire Windrush.

Compared to other migrations from the Caribbean, the one to Britain has been marked by a perception of literary success and social, economical and political failure. Young Caribbean migrants & growing up in the UK.

Little is known about the experiences of young Caribbean migrants and the children of migrants before the wave of large scale migration in the midth century. Written by Lemn Sissay 21/08/ • Return migration of retirees to the Caribbean is a trend that has gained force in recent years, with the return of a large number of migrants who left in the s (CEPAL, ).

Using a transnational theoretical framework we examine the factors which have been involved in the emergence of a return migration culture in the English-speaking Caribbean since Caribbean emigration and return is not a simplistic bipolar movement, rather the flow is best understood as a fluid looping process which has some backflow.

This paper presents a review of the return migration. One remaining area of migration-related research that continued to interest a few geographers concerned the adjustment, accommodation and adaptation processes of Caribbean immigrants in receiving metropoli, predominantly United States urban communities.

Immigrant waves to Florida of Cubans and Haitians were. Instrumental organizations mobilize immigrant communities to make connections with Migration in The Bahamas and the Caribbean: A Bibliography.

Description bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities FB2

“Migration of Caribbean people. WASHINGTON — More than million of the estimated million Venezuelan refugees and migrants who have fled the ongoing complex socio-political and economic landscape in their country remain in Latin America or the Caribbean.

While the movements have been widespread across the region, they are far from monolithic in their character. Genre/Form: Bibliography: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Castro, Mary Garcia. Women and migration, Latin America and the Caribbean.

Gainesville: Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, © Young Children in Black Immigrant Families Annotated Bibliography Prepared by Kristen McCabe, Leticia J. Braga, and Cristina Batog Migration Policy Institute October Introduction There are million children in Black immigrant families in the United States, most with parents from Africa and the Caribbean.

The Death of the West: How Dying Populations and Immigrants Invasions Imperil Our Country and Civilization New York Thomas Dunne Book/St. Martin's Press Callero, E.

Popular Sovereignty and the Law of Peoples 9 Legal Theory These immigrants are part of the more than 2 million people who have migrated out of the Caribbean in the last 50 years and are testaments to the fact that immigration has become an integral part of Caribbean life.

These three families are the protagonists of Karen Fog Olwig’s latest book, Caribbean Journeys: An Ethnography of Migration and. Indo-Caribbeans or Indian-Caribbeans, are people of Indian descent who live in the are mostly descendants of the original jahaji Indian indentured workers brought by the British, the Dutch, and the French during colonial times.

Most Indo-Caribbean people live in the English-speaking Caribbean nations, Suriname, and the French overseas departments of Guadeloupe, Martinique, and. Bibliography. Alan H.

Adamson, Sugar without slaves: The political economy of British Guiana, (London and New Haven: Yale University Press, ) Jorma Ahvenainen, The History of the Caribbean Telegraphs before the First World War (Helsinki: Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia, ) Juanita De Barros, Order and Place in a Colonial City: Patterns of Struggle and Resistance in Georgetown.

Introduction to Caribbean Migration. New York City has come to be the known as the “ultimate frontier” for the majority of Caribbean immigrants. Caribbean immigration has separated into two migration waves: The first major wave of migration from Caribbean occurred between and ’s.

Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index. Contents. Part 1 Origins and destinations: Caribbean development and the migration imperative by Ransford, -- 19th-century West Indian migration to Britain, Peter -- forty-and-one years on - an overview of Afro-Caribbean migration to the United Kingdom, Mel on.

Author Biography. Rhonda Hackett is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Human and Social Development, School of Social Work at the University of Victoria. Her teaching and research interests include African Caribbean immigration, decolonizing methodologies and.

The Caribbean is one such society where multi-culturalism has been put to test. This book is an attempt to understand Caribbean histories, patterns of migration and race-relations.

Download bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities FB2

It is a collection of essays by Caribbean writers like V.S. Naipaul, Paule Marshall, Jean. The interaction of the economic factors relevant to the residents of these Caribbean nations and to the U.S.

economy explains, to a large degree, their migration patterns. Prior to more specific discussions of each of the Caribbean groups, the author discusses the incorporation process, which entails adaptation, integration, and absorption.

The Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) has published more than books on a range of migration-related topics, including immigrant integration, the intersection of religion and immigration, Italian-American immigrant communities, and immigration in New York City.This brief by the Migration Policy Institute offers an updated portrait of Caribbean immigrants, who accounted for about one-tenth of the million immigrants in the U.S in Using data from a variety of sources, including the U.S.

Census Bureau and the United National Population Division, the report begins by briefly discussing the. Figure 1 shows that it makes sense to view the Caribbean as a conjunction of two regions. It points out that about 90% of the immigrants from Jamaica and Haiti were listed as black on the census, while only about 6% of the immigrants from Cuba and the Dominican Republic were listed as .